Diagram 133

Re Talk: 294


 Diagram # 133 illustration

Diagram # 133 illustration


It is impossible to smell one smell.  It would be impossible to touch one touch.  If you do not have two samples of anything, you cannot be conscious of one.  If all you ever had in your life was one odor -- do you hear me -- you would have no sense of smell; you wouldn't know whether you were smelling anything or not.  If you were to smell the one smell, you would have smelled nothing.  You couldn't discuss smelling, nobody could ask you whether you'd ever smelled anything.  If they tried to describe it, you wouldn't be able to follow any of their descriptions.  You have to have two samples to be conscious of one.  And in a humorous way, I suggest to you that that's true with all the senses.  In an even more humorous way, I suggest to you that that's true with thinking, that you could not have one thought and still be conscious.

     You could look upon the matter of contrast as though there were two pools of contrast.  You have to have at least two samples or you have no contrast.  You cannot smell one smell.  So, the bare minimum for a contrast would be two areas, two sources to draw on, except for this:  you'd really have to have a third one, otherwise you would immediately, if not sooner, run through all the combinations.  The two combinations would have spent themselves; and you would be left with that one, immediate contrast with no possibility of there ever being other new ones.  So, I would suggest to you that there has to be at least a third pool that would furnish a continuing supply of fresh contrast. JC talk 294