Jan Cox Talk 0332

A Real Revolutionist's Private Agenda is Private

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Summary by TK

Jan Cox Talk #332 * Apr 11, 1988 * - 1:33 
A Real Revolutionist‘s private agenda is private; his own and not subject to the actions of others. ]
  [To have an agenda contingent upon the behavior of others means doing nothing.  The actions of others are of no consequence to a Real Revolutionist – therefore he will not engage in gossip. ]
  [A Real Revolutionist should evaluate his possessions according to whether they are useful, or if not useful, beautiful.  Possessions are not in some way evil – but why own anything not useful or beautiful?  There can be a real attraction and satisfaction to a ―stripped down existence; stripped down to only those things you like, for instance. ]
  [Kyroot messages, though inclined to tickle, are more than comedic one liners.  Just because something is funny doesn‘t mean it‘s a joke. ]
  [Reading of Kyroot papers from last year 0:16 -> 0:40. 
  [Paradigm presentation from 0:40 -> 1:33 


Transcript

A REAL REVOLUTIONIST'S PRIVATE AGENDA IS PRIVATE

Copyright (c) Jan M. Cox, 1988
Document:  332, April 11, 1988

                       
     I want everyone to fully realize that a Real Revolutionist's private agenda, his dance card, is in no way linked to the actions of anyone else.  This is a little tricky.  This does not mean that he must engage in some form of stubbornness.  Nor does it mean that he is continually having to create new dance steps to make up for other people's actions.  To illustrate what it does mean, let's take this example:  A Real Revolutionist would not talk about other people.  In other words, he would not participate in anything that even resembles gossip.  He would not gossip, and that's it.  The actions of those around him, no matter where he was, would be of no consequence.  He would not gossip.  This is not a holding pattern.  It is not even a continual improvisation regarding how to dance around the edges of this or how can to avoid that.  It is simply that a Revolutionist's agenda is his own and does not depend on the actions of others.

     Now of course, the Real Revolutionist's private agenda is not the going reality of the 3-D world.  Ordinary consciousness is not wired up to deal in such agendas.  That is not the way things are done in the City.  Such an agenda is only the way things are dreamed of being done.  For City folk it is still just a sweet dream that someone could even have such an agenda; that someone could be so driven that he would fly in the face of 10,000 drawn knives, or worse yet, 20,000 self-directed bad opinions.

     A Revolutionist's private agenda does not have anything to do with wrestling with anyone else.  And a change in one's private agenda is not determined by or tied to the behavior of others.  The prevalent City-wide attitude, "I'll change, but they've got to do their part," does not hold true for a Revolutionist.  For if your agenda is linked to the behavior of anyone else, you are not doing anything.  You are still a sucker.  And while we are all suckers in one sense, waiting in line to be slaughtered, if you link your agenda to others then you are still there with the rest of humanity, shuffling your feet, cursing the gods, not knowing which way change comes about.

     Many people who become involved with an Activity such as this have a built-in dream schematic regarding possessions.  There is a common, almost pleasant sensation that people get when they think, "Maybe I should just take most of the stuff I own, especially all these books I've been collecting for the last 20 years, and just throw this stuff away.  Sometimes I begin to think that I don't possess these books, they possess me."  Any of you who are fairly well read should know that this is not a new idea.  And it has some validity.  The reason I never responded to it much in the past is because I don't normally deal with things that are already out in common currency in the City.  But I do want to point out to you that a Real Revolutionist, that is, a fictitious reasonably insane person, should ask himself, " What am I doing owning anything that is not either useful or beautiful to me?"  At that point you would be within your rights to scrutinize your possessions, no matter what spurred you to purchase them in the first place.  Forget all that.  Look at your possessions.  You've got them indoors so that they won't rust or get hit by lightening or get stolen.  They are your possessions which you paid for either through time, money or effort.  Now can you look at some of your possessions and say, "This is no longer useful.  I do not use it.  I haven't used in the last 10 years, and can't foresee using it again -- why do I have it?"

     If a possession is not useful, it should be beautiful.  Whether it's a painting, a piece of sculpture, a stained glass, it should be something that you personally like.  You should not need an audience or a critic to come tell you whether it's good or not.  You simply find it beautiful.

     I repeat:  there is some validity to the feeling and the reality of monks and those in religious orders giving up sex, talk and all their worldly possessions.  It rightfully has some appeal to City folk, but I don't discuss it a lot because it is so easy for people to interpret that as, "I should just abandon everything."  Then you are just one step from believing that all possessions in some way are evil.  It's not that they are evil; it's that your having them is dumb if they are not either useful or beautiful to you.

     There is a way in which a Real Revolutionist should get himself stripped down, so that he could find out that he can do without a lot of Life's so-called goods.  There is a certain real attraction to being stripped down to the bare minimum.  That doesn't mean that you have to do without.  Instead, how about if you only did with that which you liked?  Let's say you like books, and you don't find them offensive or burdensome, then collect them.  If you like music, and part of your hobby involves protecting this old tube Macintosh tuner that you've had for 20 years -- if you like that, like it.  But look around at all the rest of your stuff -- furniture, clothes, power tools, books.  Not just the things themselves, look at your relationship to these things.  You think to yourself, "What do these other poor blind pigs around me think about me, and the way I'm dressed?  Do I have the New York magazine rolled up and stuck in my pocket with the top up so that they can be sure and see what I'm reading?"  In the City, everyone gets possessions in order to better their position.  But remember, it's still a position in a line to the inevitable slaughterhouse.

      Now I'd like to mention something about Kyroot for those of you who may be reading this material for the first time.  Kyroot is a guy who seems to know a lot and seems to transcend all limits of time and space.  He sends these one-line messages generally, and occasionally sends a little story; and generally they are inclined to tickle.  (Now don't get any ordinary City notions that he's someone who speaks to me from another planet or any other nonsense.  He is my "altro voce.")  The purpose of using the Kyroot messages is not to set him up on the club circuit as a new comedian.  I remind you:  just because something is funny doesn't mean it's a joke.  The purpose is as serious as what I do, but it is in a slightly different form, and by and large I have come to have some faith in him.  I usually don't comment on his one-liners and stories except indirectly.  But I remind you again:  just because it's funny doesn't mean it's a joke.